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ABOUT

PERSONAL DETAILS
Princetonplein 5, Office 578, De Uithof 3584 CC Utrecht
f.b.aydemir@uu.nl
+31 302534174
Hello. Hallo. Ciao. Merhaba. I am a postdoctoral researcher at the Utrecht University. Welcome to my web site.

BIO

ABOUT ME

I am a postdoctoral researcher in the Organization & Information research group at the Department of Information and Computing Sciences, Utrecht University, the Netherlands. I work with Dr. Fabiano Dalpiaz.

My main research interest is requirements engineering to help people build right systems. I specifically work on goal-oriented requirements modeling languages and automated reasoning techniques.

My research is currently funded by the European Commission through the PACAS project (Participatory Architectural Change Management in ATM Systems).

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RESUME

EDUCATION
ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS
HONORS AND AWARDS
  • 2013
    2013
    TRENTO, ITALY

    PHD ON THE MOVE MOBILITY GRANT

    TRENTORISE

    I received a mobility grant from Trento Rise to visit Prof. Munindar Singh at the North Carolina State University for 3 months.
  • 2010
    2011
    İSTANBUL, TURKEY

    National MS Scholarship

    TÜBİTAK ( THE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF TURKEY)

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PUBLICATIONS

PUBLICATIONS LIST
13 Sep 2016

An Empirical Evaluation Roadmap for iStar 2.0

iStar Workshop

The iStar 2.0 modeling language is the result of a two-year community effort intended at providing a solid, unified basis for teaching and conducting research with i*. The language was released with important qualities in mind, such as keeping a core set of primitives, providing a clear meaning for those primitives, and flattening the learning curve for new users. In this paper, we propose a list of qualities against which we intend iStar 2.0 to be evaluated. Furthermore, we describe an empirical evaluation plan, which we devise in order to assess the extent to which the language meets the identified qualities and to inform the development of further versions of the language. Besides explaining the objectives and steps of our planned empirical studies, we make a call for involving the research community in our endeavor.

Workshop Papers Lidia López, Fatma Başak Aydemir, Fabiano Dalpiaz, Jennifer Horkoff

An Empirical Evaluation Roadmap for iStar 2.0

Lidia López, Fatma Başak Aydemir, Fabiano Dalpiaz, Jennifer Horkoff Workshop Papers

The iStar 2.0 modeling language is the result of a two-year community effort intended at providing a solid, unified basis for teaching and conducting research with i*. The language was released with important qualities in mind, such as keeping a core set of primitives, providing a clear meaning for those primitives, and flattening the learning curve for new users. In this paper, we propose a list of qualities against which we intend iStar 2.0 to be evaluated. Furthermore, we describe an empirical evaluation plan, which we devise in order to assess the extent to which the language meets the identified qualities and to inform the development of further versions of the language. Besides explaining the objectives and steps of our planned empirical studies, we make a call for involving the research community in our endeavor.

01 Jun 2016

Solving the next adaptation problem with prometheus

RCIS 2016: 1-10

Dealing with multiple requirement failures is an essential capability for self-adaptive software systems. This capability becomes more challenging in the presence of conflicting goals. This paper is concerned with the next adaptation problem: the problem of finding the best next adaptation in the presence of multiple failures. ‘Best’ here means that the adaptation chosen optimizes a given set of objective functions, such as the cost of adaptation or the degree of failure for system requirements. The paper proposes a formal framework for defining the next adaptation problem, assuming that we can specify quantitatively the constraints that hold between indicators that measure the degree of failure of each requirement and control parameters. These constraints, along with one or several objective functions, are translated into a constrained multi-objective optimization problem that can be solved by using an OMT/SMT (Optimization Modulo Theories/Satisfiability Modulo Theories) solver, such as OptiMathSAT. The proposed framework is illustrated with the Meeting Scheduler exemplar and a second, e-shop case study.

Conferences Konstantinos Angelopoulos, Fatma Başak Aydemir, Paolo Giorgini, John Mylopoulos

Solving the next adaptation problem with prometheus

Konstantinos Angelopoulos, Fatma Başak Aydemir, Paolo Giorgini, John Mylopoulos Conferences

Dealing with multiple requirement failures is an essential capability for self-adaptive software systems. This capability becomes more challenging in the presence of conflicting goals. This paper is concerned with the next adaptation problem: the problem of finding the best next adaptation in the presence of multiple failures. ‘Best’ here means that the adaptation chosen optimizes a given set of objective functions, such as the cost of adaptation or the degree of failure for system requirements. The paper proposes a formal framework for defining the next adaptation problem, assuming that we can specify quantitatively the constraints that hold between indicators that measure the degree of failure of each requirement and control parameters. These constraints, along with one or several objective functions, are translated into a constrained multi-objective optimization problem that can be solved by using an OMT/SMT (Optimization Modulo Theories/Satisfiability Modulo Theories) solver, such as OptiMathSAT. The proposed framework is illustrated with the Meeting Scheduler exemplar and a second, e-shop case study.

02 Jun 2016

Multi-objective risk analysis with goal models

RCIS 2016: 1-10

Risks of software projects are often ignored and risk analysis is left for later stages of project life-cycle, resulting in serious financial losses. This paper proposes a goal-oriented risk analysis framework that includes inter-dependencies among treatments and risks in terms of likelihood and generate optimal solutions with respect to multiple objectives such as goal rewards, treatment costs, or risk factor. The Loan Origination Process illustrates our approach and a detailed analysis of the visual notation is provided.

Conferences Fatma Başak Aydemir, Paolo Giorgini, John Mylopoulos

Multi-objective risk analysis with goal models

Fatma Başak Aydemir, Paolo Giorgini, John Mylopoulos Conferences

Risks of software projects are often ignored and risk analysis is left for later stages of project life-cycle, resulting in serious financial losses. This paper proposes a goal-oriented risk analysis framework that includes inter-dependencies among treatments and risks in terms of likelihood and generate optimal solutions with respect to multiple objectives such as goal rewards, treatment costs, or risk factor. The Loan Origination Process illustrates our approach and a detailed analysis of the visual notation is provided.

10 Oct 2015

Next release tool

ER 2015 Demos

In this paper we present Next Release Tool (NRT), a software tool that supports modeling and reasoning to solve the next release problem. NRT supports a goal-oriented modeling language and uses an underlying satisfiability modulo theorem (SMT) solver with optimization capabilities.

Demonstrations Fatma Başak Aydemir, Dagmawi Neway Mekuria, Paolo Giorgini, John Mylopoulos

Next release tool

Fatma Başak Aydemir, Dagmawi Neway Mekuria, Paolo Giorgini, John Mylopoulos Demonstrations

In this paper we present Next Release Tool (NRT), a software tool that supports modeling and reasoning to solve the next release problem. NRT supports a goal-oriented modeling language and uses an underlying satisfiability modulo theorem (SMT) solver with optimization capabilities.

02 Oct 2014

Evaluating Modeling Languages: An Example from the Requirements Domain

ER 2014: 260-274

Modeling languages have been evaluated through empirical studies, comparisons of language grammars, and ontological analyses. In this paper we take the first approach, evaluating the expressiveness and effectiveness of Techne, a requirements modeling language, by applying it to three requirements problems from the literature. We use our experiences to propose a number of language improvements for Techne, addressing challenges discovered during the studies. This work presents an example evaluation of modeling language expressiveness and effectiveness through realistic case studies.

Conferences Jennifer Horkoff, Fatma Başak Aydemir, Feng-Lin Li, Tong Li, John Mylopoulos

Evaluating Modeling Languages: An Example from the Requirements Domain

Jennifer Horkoff, Fatma Başak Aydemir, Feng-Lin Li, Tong Li, John Mylopoulos Conferences

Modeling languages have been evaluated through empirical studies, comparisons of language grammars, and ontological analyses. In this paper we take the first approach, evaluating the expressiveness and effectiveness of Techne, a requirements modeling language, by applying it to three requirements problems from the literature. We use our experiences to propose a number of language improvements for Techne, addressing challenges discovered during the studies. This work presents an example evaluation of modeling language expressiveness and effectiveness through realistic case studies.

24 Aug 2014

Protos: Foundations for engineering innovative sociotechnical systems

RE 2014: 53-62

We address the challenge of requirements engineering for sociotechnical systems, wherein humans and organizations supported by technical artifacts such as software interact with one another. Traditional requirements models emphasize the goals of the stakeholders above their interactions. However, the participants in a sociotechnical system may not adopt the goals of the stakeholders involved in its specification. We motivate, Protos, a requirements engineering approach that gives prominence to the interactions of autonomous parties and specifies a sociotechnical system in terms of its participants' social relationships, specifically, commitments. The participants can adopt any goal they like, a key basis for innovative behavior, as long as they interact according to the commitments. Protos describes an abstract requirements engineering process as a series of refinements that seek to satisfy stakeholder requirements by incrementally expanding a specification set and an assumption set, and reducing requirements until all requirements are accommodated. We demonstrate this process via the London Ambulance System described in the literature.

Conferences Amit K. Chopra, Fabiano Dalpiaz, Fatma Başak Aydemir, Paolo Giorgini, John Mylopoulos, Munindar P. Singh

Protos: Foundations for engineering innovative sociotechnical systems

Amit K. Chopra, Fabiano Dalpiaz, Fatma Başak Aydemir, Paolo Giorgini, John Mylopoulos, Munindar P. Singh Conferences

We address the challenge of requirements engineering for sociotechnical systems, wherein humans and organizations supported by technical artifacts such as software interact with one another. Traditional requirements models emphasize the goals of the stakeholders above their interactions. However, the participants in a sociotechnical system may not adopt the goals of the stakeholders involved in its specification. We motivate, Protos, a requirements engineering approach that gives prominence to the interactions of autonomous parties and specifies a sociotechnical system in terms of its participants’ social relationships, specifically, commitments. The participants can adopt any goal they like, a key basis for innovative behavior, as long as they interact according to the commitments. Protos describes an abstract requirements engineering process as a series of refinements that seek to satisfy stakeholder requirements by incrementally expanding a specification set and an assumption set, and reducing requirements until all requirements are accommodated. We demonstrate this process via the London Ambulance System described in the literature.

05 Jun 2014

Designing sociotechnical systems with Protos

iStar 2014

Traditional requirements engineering approaches give little emphasis on the engineering of interactions. Increasingly, the software systems of today are developed independently and integrated with each other, as in sociotechnical systems, where several technical systems support the interaction between the social systems. We propose the Protos methodology as a set of refinement rules which, once applied to the stakeholder requirements, produce multiple specifications as a solution to the requirements problem of sociotechnical systems. We use the London Ambulance System as an example domain.

Workshop Papers Fatma Başak Aydemir, Paolo Giorgini, John Mylopoulos

Designing sociotechnical systems with Protos

Fatma Başak Aydemir, Paolo Giorgini, John Mylopoulos Workshop Papers
Traditional requirements engineering approaches give little emphasis on the engineering of interactions. Increasingly, the software systems of today are developed independently and integrated with each other, as in sociotechnical systems, where several technical systems support the interaction between the social systems. We propose the Protos methodology as a set of refinement rules which, once applied to the stakeholder requirements, produce multiple specifications as a solution to the requirements problem of sociotechnical systems. We use the London Ambulance System as an example domain.
01 Jun 2014

Exploring alternative designs for sociotechnical systems

RCIS 2014: 1-12

Sociotechnial systems (STSs) consist of a complex interplay of technical components, humans, and organizations. As other types of systems, STSs need to evolve in response to changing requirements and operational environments. Evolving STSs is a complex activity, which requires reconfiguration of technical components as well as rerouting of interactions among human and social actors. Moreover, reconfiguration has to respect participant autonomy, while coping with conflicting goals and noncooperation in identifying a configuration that minimizes changes relative to the current configuration. In this paper, we present a framework that supports design and evolution of STSs. The framework includes (i) the DEST language for modeling STSs as goal-oriented actors that interact via social commitments; (ii) techniques for building a network of interactions that fulfills participant requirements; and (iii) techniques for evolving an existing STS while minimizing change. We encode the design and evolution of STSs as an automated planning problem.

Conferences Fatma Başak Aydemir, Paolo Giorgini, John Mylopoulos, Fabiano Dalpiaz

Exploring alternative designs for sociotechnical systems

Fatma Başak Aydemir, Paolo Giorgini, John Mylopoulos, Fabiano Dalpiaz Conferences

Sociotechnial systems (STSs) consist of a complex interplay of technical components, humans, and organizations. As other types of systems, STSs need to evolve in response to changing requirements and operational environments. Evolving STSs is a complex activity, which requires reconfiguration of technical components as well as rerouting of interactions among human and social actors. Moreover, reconfiguration has to respect participant autonomy, while coping with conflicting goals and noncooperation in identifying a configuration that minimizes changes relative to the current configuration. In this paper, we present a framework that supports design and evolution of STSs. The framework includes (i) the DEST language for modeling STSs as goal-oriented actors that interact via social commitments; (ii) techniques for building a network of interactions that fulfills participant requirements; and (iii) techniques for evolving an existing STS while minimizing change. We encode the design and evolution of STSs as an automated planning problem.

01 Mar 2013

A timeline visualization for multi-team collaborative planning

CHI Extended Abstracts 2013: 157-162

Developing and corroborating plans for critical missions (e.g., space missions) is not a trivial task. Our research focuses on designing and evaluating a planning tool that supports a team of experts engaged in sharing, cross-validating, and refining existing plans. We designed a plan visualization tool to support multi-team collaborative planning for operations on the International Space Station. We built and evaluated two prototypes, a text-based tool representing the current practice and a new, dual timeline visualization tool. In this paper we present the design and the formative evaluation, which indicated the promise of the proposed design but also identified implementation issues.

Conferences Ligia Maria Batrinca, Muhammad Tahir Khan, Dorrit Billman, Başak Aydemir, Gregorio Convertino

A timeline visualization for multi-team collaborative planning

Ligia Maria Batrinca, Muhammad Tahir Khan, Dorrit Billman, Başak Aydemir, Gregorio Convertino Conferences

Developing and corroborating plans for critical missions (e.g., space missions) is not a trivial task. Our research focuses on designing and evaluating a planning tool that supports a team of experts engaged in sharing, cross-validating, and refining existing plans. We designed a plan visualization tool to support multi-team collaborative planning for operations on the International Space Station. We built and evaluated two prototypes, a text-based tool representing the current practice and a new, dual timeline visualization tool. In this paper we present the design and the formative evaluation, which indicated the promise of the proposed design but also identified implementation issues.

01 Jan 2013

Multiagent cooperation for solving global optimization problems: an extendible framework with example cooperation strategies

J. Global Optimization57(2): 499-519

This paper proposes the use of multiagent cooperation for solving global optimization problems through the introduction of a new multiagent environment, MANGO. The strength of the environment lays in its flexible structure based on communicating software agents that attempt to solve a problem cooperatively. This structure allows the execution of a wide range of global optimization algorithms described as a set of interacting operations. At one extreme, MANGO welcomes an individual non-cooperating agent, which is basically the traditional way of solving a global optimization problem. At the other extreme, autonomous agents existing in the environment cooperate as they see fit during run time. We explain the development and communication tools provided in the environment as well as examples of agent realizations and cooperation scenarios. We also show how the multiagent structure is more effective than having a single nonlinear optimization algorithm with randomly selected initial points.

Journal Papers Fatma Başak Aydemir, Akin Günay, Figen Öztoprak, S. Ilker Birbil, Pinar Yolum

Multiagent cooperation for solving global optimization problems: an extendible framework with example cooperation strategies

Fatma Başak Aydemir, Akin Günay, Figen Öztoprak, S. Ilker Birbil, Pinar Yolum Journal Papers

This paper proposes the use of multiagent cooperation for solving global optimization problems through the introduction of a new multiagent environment, MANGO. The strength of the environment lays in its flexible structure based on communicating software agents that attempt to solve a problem cooperatively. This structure allows the execution of a wide range of global optimization algorithms described as a set of interacting operations. At one extreme, MANGO welcomes an individual non-cooperating agent, which is basically the traditional way of solving a global optimization problem. At the other extreme, autonomous agents existing in the environment cooperate as they see fit during run time. We explain the development and communication tools provided in the environment as well as examples of agent realizations and cooperation scenarios. We also show how the multiagent structure is more effective than having a single nonlinear optimization algorithm with randomly selected initial points.

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RESEARCH

RESEARCH PROJECTS

PACAS

Participatory Architectural Change MAnagement in ATM Systems

Participatory Architectural Change MAnagement in ATM Systems (PACAS) is a Horizon 2020 project in the framework of the SESAR Research and Innovation Action (RIA). Started in March 2016, PACAS will last 24 months. The main objective is to better understand, model and analyse changes at different layers of the Air Traffic Management (ATM) system to support change management, while capturing how architectural and design choices influence the overall system. The project aims at developing an innovative participatory change management process wherein heterogeneous stakeholders actively participate in the architectural evolution of the ATM system.

Dr. Fabiano Dalpiaz is the leader of the Utrecht University team. Utrecht University leads the work package responsible of the development of the PACAS platform. We also focus on adding game elements and mechanisms to the participatory design and change management process.

Lucretius: Foundations for Software Evolution

ERC Advanced Investigator Grant n.267856

My PhD was funded by the Lucretius project. I worked on modeling and analysing requirements for sociotechnical systems design. I mainly devised goal-oriented requirements modeling languages and applied automated reasoning techniques to requirements models.